Stories

Plantago

14 October 2020

Plantain is often touted as a healthy forage plant high in vitamins A and C, it is also really very bitter. 

This specimen was photographed growing in the middle of the dirt road leading up to where we shot our lookbook.

 

Dipsacus

14 October 2020

Teasels take their name from the fact that their seedheads were originally used to 'tease' wool fabric, raising the nap and creating an even finish.

This specimen was photographed growing in the middle of the dirt road leading up to where we shot our lookbook.

Taraxacum

14 October 2020

Perennial invaders of lawns and pavement cracks dandelions are also a good source of pollen and nectar for insects. On top of that from the root to the petal the entire plant is edible, if a little bitter.

We photographed this specimen on the dirt road leading up to where we shot our lookbook.

Daucus carota

12 October 2020

Wild carrot is a widespread edible weed, the white flowers cover meadows in august and can be fried as a delicious snack, they are also a great source of pollen and nectar for insects. Don't confuse them with poison hemlock though, or you will die. 

This specimen was photographed growing next to where we shot our lookbook.

Helianthus tuberosus

05 October 2020

From colonisers of carparks to infiltrators of lawns this collection is a celebration of those weedy wonders which bring life and diversity to otherwise barren places. Not only are many weeds fantastic pioneers of extremely challenging environments such as the cracks in a pavement or a baking hot motorway verge but many of them are also extremely valuable sources of pollen and nectar to many insects.

Helianthus tuberosus, known as Jerusalem artichoke, is grown as a crop for its potato like tubers. Originating in north America it can now be found naturalised through southern Europe coming into bright yellow flower during the depths of summer heat.